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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
[ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. try our easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. it's another reason more investors are saying... boproductivity up, costs down, thtime to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. [ticking] >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. [cheers and applause] >> when steve jobs handpicked walter isaacson to write his life story, he had already been diagnosed with cancer, but after 40 interviews, the biography provides a vivid picture of a complicated man. >> i think it's a tough book. >> it's a book that's fair. i mean, this is a real human being. >> you will hear tape recordings of jobs himself talking about being adopted, creating apple, and his regret over ignoring what could have been life-saving cancer surgery. >
's no spitting or anything, so no one knows you're doing it. >> he uses a product called snus, a big new idea in smokeless tobacco, and the tobacco companies are banking on it. >> thank you. >> it was started in sweden, where it's getting credit for helping people quit smoking, even though it keeps them addicted to nicotine what sweden has done is traded one addiction for another addiction. >> that's true. addiction is a problem, but it's less of a problem than lung cancer. [ticking] >> its inventor and investors say it will change the way we power our homes, bypassing the traditional electric grid. is the bloom box intended to get rid of the grid? >> the bloom box is intended to replace the grid for its customers. [ticking] >> let's say if you spilled something on it... >> marty cooper looks on all this with pride, amusement, and some dismay. >> when i throw this against the wall, you--ooh. >> and with good reason. he's the father of the cell phone. >> how do i remove? i know how to add a-- but say i want to remove that one. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm lesley stahl. investors alway
that the phone company used and allowed users to make free long-distance phone calls. >> wozniak loves the blue box. he's doing it as a prank. steve says, "we can sell them. we can market them." and they sold about 100 of 'em. and jobs said to me, "that's the beginning of apple. when we started doing that blue box, i knew that with wozniak's brilliant designs and my marketing skills, we could sell anything." >> that was still a few years off. jobs enrolled at reed college in oregon at a time when timothy leary was telling students across the country to turn on, tune in, and drop out. jobs did after one semester. >> the time we grew up in was a magical time. it was also a very, you know, spiritual time in my life. definitely taking l.s.d. is one of the more important things in my life and--not the most important but right up there. >> he eventually drifted back to his parents' house and became one of the first 50 employees to work for the video game maker atari. but he was not a big hit with his coworkers. >> never wore shoes, had very long hair, never bathed. in fact, when he went to work for a
% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. use less. with the small but powerful picker upper, bounty select-a-size. [ticking] >> so many kids are homeless, school buses now stop at cheap motels. >> i never really noticed what people were actually going through until now. until we're actually going through it, too. >> jacob braverman's family is going through it in one room. after they were evicted, their neighbors took them in. >> you think all this has changed you? >> yeah, and i haven't realized it, but i think i've gotten very mature in a very short amount of time. [ticking] [train horn honking] >> chances are the electricity your tv is using comes from coal. coal, not oil, provides half the country's electricity, and there's a cost. miners die. >> they were great men. they were awesome men. >> that's why melissa lee says she's speaking out... >> thank you all. >> even though, she says, it's caused trouble for her in the county. >> i was receiving phone calls making ugly comments that i need to shut up. [ticking] >> why are hundreds of freezing pe
if you have symptoms of a heart attack. use caution when driving or operating machinery. common side effects include nausea, trouble sleeping and unusual dreams. it helps to have people around you... they say, you're much bigger than this. and you are. [ male announcer ] ask your doctor if chantix is right for you. [ticking] >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. [cheers and applause] >> when steve jobs handpicked walter isaacson to write his life story, he had already been diagnosed with cancer, but after 40 interviews, the biography provides a vivid picture of a complicated man. >> i think it's a tough book. >> it's a book that's fair. i mean, this is a real human being. >> you will hear tape recordings of jobs himself talking about being adopted, creating apple, and his regret over ignoring what could have been life-saving cancer surgery. >> you're born alone, you're gonna die alone, and what exactly is it that you have to lose? there's nothing. [ticking] it's so much more intimate than a laptop. >> when steve jobs unveiled the ipad, there was no wa
are the electricity your tv is using comes from coal. coal, not oil, provides half the country's electricity, and there's a cost. miners die. >> they were great men. they were awesome men. >> that's why melissa lee says she's speaking out... >> thank you all. >> even though, she says, it's caused trouble for her in the cy. >> i was receiving phone calls making ugly comments that i need to shut up. [ticking] >> why are hundreds of freezing people gathering in the middle of the night in this knoxville parking lot? >> who's got number one? number one. number two? >> they're here in hopes of seeing a doctor. this is a clinic set up by remote area medical, a charity founded to bring doctors to the amazon, but now it's a lifeline for the uninsured here at home. >> you drove 200 miles to get here? >> yes, sir. >> and slept in this parking lot for seven or more hours? >> yes, sir. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we look at the hard times faced by millions of americans during the economic downturn. we begin with american families falling out of the middle class. t
the last two months of patients' lives. it's a perfe example of the costs that threatened to bankrupt us and how hard it's going to be to rein them in. >> genes--as a result of them, you've inherited some of your family's finest qualities, along with predispositions to deadly diseases. you probably know that science has made giant leaps in detecting and treating some of those illnesses, but what you probably don't know is that at the same time, biotech companies have been patenting human genes. that's right. whether you like it or not, a vital part of who you are may now belong to someone else. >> let me just examine him. >> people are worried more than ever about how the chemicals we're exposed to are affecting our health. among them, a family of chemicals used in everyday plastics known as phthalates, which congress banned in toys after a study by dr. shanna swan. welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm lesley stahl. we'll be exploring the world of science in this episode. later we'll bring you morley safer's story about the human genome patents being awarded to biotech companies and the pr
over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. [clock ticking] >> i pay the bills around here, so i'm gonna set the expectations. >> howard weyers is the boss; to some former workers, the boss from hell. if random tests find one of his workers has been smoking, he or she is fired. increasingly in the american workplace, big brother, or big boss, is watching you and your private life. >> what's important? this job-- and this is a very nice place to work--or the use of tobacco? make a decision. [clock ticking] >> americans work longer hours than nearly anyone in the developed world, even the japanese. >> good morning, everyone. >> for many professionals and corporate managers... >> super, super, super-duper hot. it's crazy. >> the 40-hour work week is history. >> daddy! >> okay, hold on just a minute. >> 60-to-80-hour work weeks are now the norm. >> you don't think you're working too much? >> no. >> do you?
and unregulated in the u.s., which partly explains how a few cheaters were able to steal more than $20 million playing poker online. >> if you can see everybody's cards in poker, you could be the worst poker player in the world up against the best poker player in the world, and you're gonna beat them just about every time. [stopwatch ticking] >> gentlemen and ladies, place your bets. let the games begin. [cheers and applause] >> that's what i'm talking about! >> whoo! >> steve wynn is the man with the midas touch who added glamour to the gambling industry. >> if you're gonna start a gambling joint, start a gambling joint. >> he transformed las vegas into an international tourist spot, but the odds haven't changed. >> the only way to win in a casino... >> is to own one. >> own one. >> unless you're very lucky. [stopwatch ticking] >> internet gaming is illegal in the united states and absolutely thriving. >> yes! >> right now, as you watch this story, 70,000 people are gambling on party poker, and that's just one site. >> there will be more online poker games per day at the end of this year than
this was the scene of the crime. irving picard gave us a tour of bernie madoff's 19th-floor offices, an impressive landscape of emptiness. >> his desk was here. >> safer: picard has the thankless task of finding the money, the billions that madoff scammed. (watch ticking) arlan galbraith who called himself "the pigeon king" convinced hundreds of american and canadian farmers there was good money to be made raising the birds for food. >> and everybody we talked to said this guy was--he was on the up and up. nobody had a bad word to say about him. (watch ticking) >> stahl: welcome to "60 minutes" on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. in march 2009, bernard madoff pleaded guilty to perpetrating what's believed to be the largest financial fraud in history. he received the maximum sentence for his crime, 150 years in prison. but while madoff is behind bars, there's still much we don't know about the scam which involved, by some accounts, a fraud of more than $50 billion. investigators are still trying to figure out who was involved and where the money went. this edition features some of the people most intimately
tells us with certainty: there are more children and families that need help." well, that's our edition of 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. thank you for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> madoff. it is a name that will live in infamy. it's a tough name to live with. >> it sure is. >> in the first interview since bernie madoff's arrest, his wife ruth... >> i trusted him. >> and son andrew... >> that's who i am. my name is madoff. and i'll live with that for the rest of my life. >> speak out about crime, guilt, suicide... >> mr. madoff, what do you have to say for yourself? >> and the day bernie admitted to committing the largest financial fraud in history. >> and he said, "i have a confession to make. i've been running a ponzi scheme." [ticking] >> do you think you could pull off this scam today? >> given the same security measures? >> yep. >> easily. piece of cake. >> sam eshaghoff's scam was getting paid thousands of dollars to take the s.a.t. test for other students. he did it at least 16 times, scoring in the 97th percentile of the country. >> i would call him an academic gun for
we switched to the bargain detergent but i found myself using three times more than you're supposed to and the clothes still weren't as clean as with tide. so we're back to tide. they're cuter in clean clothes. thanks honey yeah you suck at folding [ laughs ] [ female announcer ] one cap of tide gives you more cleaning power than 6 caps of the bargain brand. [ woman ] that's my tide, what's yours? [ticking] >> madoff. it is a name that will live in infamy. it's a tough name to live with. >> it sure is. >> in the first interview since bernie madoff's arrest, his wife ruth... >> i trusted him. >> and son andrew... >> that's who i am. my name is madoff. and i'll live with that for the rest of my life. >> speak out about crime, guilt, suicide... >> mr. madoff, what do you have to say for yourself? >> and the day bernie admitted to committing the largest financial fraud in history. >> and he said, "i have a confession to make. i've been running a ponzi scheme." [ticking] >> do you think you could pull off this scam today? >> given the same security measures? >> yep. >> easily. piece of c
to be something that doesn't matter to us. what matters to us is the truth. >> it's really hard for people to believe that you didn't know, that you must have known. >> i can't explain it. i mean, i trusted him. why would it ever occur to me that it wasn't legal? the business was--his reputation was almost legendary. why would i ever think that there was something sinister going on? >> it was 1954 when ruth alpern met bernie madoff in queens, new york. >> i just saw him, and i was sort of swept away, i think. >> she married him at age 18. they had two sons: mark, then andrew. bernie was building up his money management business. a typical middle-class family living on long island. >> we were both solid parents and valued our family and so proud of our boys. it was a dream, really. >> exactly when bernie madoff went wrong is unclear. but as his reputation for delivering steady profits grew, the madoffs began living the good life. a penthouse in manhattan, homes in palm beach and the south of france, and yachts in both places. >> he was a big figure in the industry. he was the chairman of na
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)